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Warren's World Measures the Pulse
The election pulse, that is.  And that pulse is not very good at all.  In fact, if that pulse were measuring the lifeline of voter interest in this election, we'd be seeing a monitor mainly showing a flat line!
Yesterday the crew took to streets to meet with and talk to the voters. Why?  Because it's the voters who are real decision makers, the ones who choose the course of governing, the ones who set the priorities for which issues will be the most important.  If anyone is going to help get accessibility issues on the radar, it's the people.
So what did they have to say?
Some people we talked to were very serious about voting, passionate about participating, and driven with their opinions on the election.  I was inspired by these people, but saddened that they were among the minority of those with whom we spoke.
Many did not care at all about the election.  In fact, many people either didn't care or were not even aware of an upcoming election.  The most common and disturbing response I received was "I do not vote".  Warren's World crew members would just look at each other, speechless.  And, believe me, if I'm speechless and have nothing to say, my friends, then you're witnessing a very rare occurrence.
Many people were dismayed with the political system and expressed a very pointed distrust of politicians in general.  There were dead-set against participating in any way.
You see, I find this very disheartening because if people don't participate or don't care, I'm not sure how we advance important issues, like building an inclusive society and achieving accessibility.
Maybe I'm overly romantic about inclusion and participation, about being a fully participating member of society.  Maybe it's because it's something that I can't take for granted.  I only wish that more people understood and appreciated just how much they have and what voting can actually mean for them.
On a more upbeat note, that was our first in a series of experience you'll be able to read about and listen to in this section of the website.
If you have the ability to participate, and you don't have any limitations (like mine) to doing so, don't take this for granted.  Participation and inclusion is something that many people struggle to achieve each and every day.